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Cuda Lube Test

Tanfoglio Limited Pro

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#1 Twinkie

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 10:33 PM

From the Ben Stoeger Pro Shop Page:

 

 

Cudalube-3T.jpg?1417936310

 

Description clear1x1.gif clear1x1.gif   DBox_Border_Left_Top.gif clear1x1.gif DBox_Border_Right_Top.gif clear1x1.gif
There have been quite a few niche lubricants over the last several years that have in some way gotten a following. Cudalube is Ben's current favorite. This is a high viscosity lubricant, not a grease like slide-glide. This lubricant stays in place for quite a long time and then wipes off easily, facilitating easy cleaning of your pistol.

The bottom line, if you are a lazy bastard like Ben and you want to lube your pistol the absolute minimum number of times and have it stay lubed for the maximum amount of time, Cudalube is pretty damn boss.


Info from Cudalube:

CUDALUBE is a high performance lubricant developed by Shooting Sports Innovations.
 
Packaged in a 2 Ounce Bottle. Kit includes an 18 gauge needle dispenser and a sealed cap.
 
CUDALUBE is a low friction gun oil that will keep your investments running in the harshest conditions. It will stay where applied and provide a ball bearing action to your moving parts. Cleaning your firearm is easier with CUDALUBE due to it's zero friction characteristics and carbon suspension properties. A single cloth and/or Q-tip is all that is needed. It is safe for all firearms inlcuding polymer frames, gas driven rifles, and is also great for any sqeaky wheel around the house. Proven by thousands of rounds of testing in my experience in shooting sports, this product is the last gun lubricant you will ever need. Remember, if you compete in any type of shooting sports.... when friction strikes, you lose!
 

 

I'm an inveterate tinkerer with my guns. I'm always trying to make them run better, stay clean longer, have the lightest trigger pulls possible, and generally not break so much. Well, I've not had much luck with the last one but I've tried a lot of lubes out on the market in an effort to keep my guns running better for longer periods without a good cleaning. With the annoying horror show inside my Limited Pro I've become more interested in ways to avoid stripping it down when the products of combustion become built-up to the point where performance suffers. 

 

A bit of discussion on why i hate having to clean the Tanfoglio:

 

I love 1911's. I love taking them apart and cleaning everything and then putting everything back together with just the right amount of grease and oil in just the right places. In general, you can run a 1911 for a really long time with just taking care of the gunk that builds up in the rails and the slide assembly. The firing mechanism doesn't fill with crud very quickly and trigger pulls aren't overly affected until the tartar-like gunk becomes severe. Also, 1911's have no roll pins (one of mine does for the external extractor, but I've not taken that out in over 20K rounds through the gun so it kinda doesn't count) and they come apart so easily. Not so the Tanfo! 

 

To get the ambi safety out is a roll pin, then the hammer pin pin has to be looked after, then there is another roll pin and a retarded trigger return spring to fight with on reassembly. Finally there is a crazy trigger bar plunger that fits into the mag catch! Sheer lunacy! The reason all this crap matters is that I've seen my gun's trigger pull go from smooth and crisp to heavy, gritty, and generally awful over the course of a mere 3K rounds and weeks of dry fire. I shoot coated bullets, and they leave behind a black soot and due to the awesome way a Tanfo works, the innards get coated in this vile gunk in short order. Trigger components are unprotected, and there are a lot of surfaces that can get grimy real fast. 

 

I've been using a light Lubriplate FMO-350-AW oil for the innards, and Slide Glide (standard; and since the weather got colder, light) for the rails and barrel. This has worked all right, but the Tanfo has a lot of bearing surface on the rails and during a recent Ben Stoeger class my gun malfunctioned due to the grease being too think and the gun too dirty. I had the opportunity to look inside Ben's gun, and saw it was almost dry. My tendency is to dunk the gun in oil and wipe off the excess but this got me thinking - What if I could get away with almost no lubricant at all? After all, oil and grease are sticky and combined with the gunk can cause problems.

 

Enter Cuda Lube. I am trying this stuff on Ben's recommendation, and because he is apparently a "lazy bastard" (see above ad copy) this stuff is supposed to last a while. The problem with oils in my experience is while they are nice and light they run out of the gun and are gone when you need them. I dry fire way more than live fire, and prefer to just throw my gun in the range bag and head out rather than do a special "make ready" ritual before leaving the house. We shall see, as I intend to put this lube to a test.

 

I cleaned my unicorn moderately well, and applied Cuda Lube to the places shown below:

 

Plunger

 

Trigger Bar

 
Sear

 

Inside Rails

 
Barrel (Sorry, can't see it. On the front lockup area and the lugs)
 
Slide Rails

 

I will endeavor to show these areas as time goes by and I live fire. The goal is to see how long the Cuda Lube lasts and to report subjective experience with the gun.


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#2 Twinkie

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 10:33 PM

12/09/14

 

Initial clean and application.

 

Gun feels awesome. Trigger is light, lively, and smooth with no friction. Small stacking right at the end of the DA. Best it's ever felt!

 

Slide action is smooth, no grit.



#3 not that bryan

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 11:06 PM

I'll try the same on the cz once I've cleaned it this weekend after Cherokee.

I'll also try it on the 1911. Hopefully it will stay put but run like oil. That gun dislikes grease.

#4 dels

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 01:50 AM

looking forward to your impressions a few hundred rounds down the the road.



#5 LeadChucker

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 06:21 AM

Geez, that's a hell of a cleaning

How often do you break it down that far for cleaning?

#6 pinkad

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 06:46 AM

I don't think my trigger bar was that clean when it arrived from the factory!!



#7 Miculek is a Noob

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 07:36 AM

This thread is worthless without a double blind test -- you're saying this lube makes the trigger pull better? Better than Slideglide or Mobil 1 or Ballistol or canola oil?

 

You also deserve a warning point for posting thorough, thoughtful, useful shooting-related content. With photos. 


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#8 Vagetarian

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:22 AM

Ben is withholding his warning point until he gets his shit together. It's on the shelf with his timer.

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I just man-handled that prick with my Type-A personality.
Dipshit tard duckweed goat humper.

You're all a bunch of fucking idiots and retards!


#9 Twinkie

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:27 AM

Geez, that's a hell of a cleaning
How often do you break it down that far for cleaning?

  

I don't think my trigger bar was that clean when it arrived from the factory!!

  

It's not as clean as it could be. I just said "Fuck it, it's clean enough." The shiny parts inside were where my gun got "tooned" and when I get another Tanfo I will polish what I need to polish and leave the rest the hell alone. There are some weird geometry problems in my gun due to too much material being removed.

As for how often I break it down this far to clean it- about once a month seems right. Mainly because the damn trigger return spring broke all the time and if I have to take it down to that point I might as well clean it.

This thread is worthless without a double blind test -- you're saying this lube makes the trigger pull better? Better than Slideglide or Mobil 1 or Ballistol or canola oil?
 
You also deserve a warning point for posting thorough, thoughtful, useful shooting-related content. With photos.


Double blind? I think this is more of a pseudo-experimental design with self-report measures. All I can do is report my own subjective experience with the trigger. I could go get a trigger pull gague but screw spending $50 or w/e just for Doodie Project.

I am saying right now this gun has a really sweet trigger pull. When it gets dirty I will report how that trigger pull feels.

IMO the cuda lube helped a little bit on the trigger pull. Also, polishing the relevant surfaces and lubing just what you need to lube are the way to go. Too much oil/grease had the effect of making the pull heavier and not as crisp in my previous experience.

#10 ny32182

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:34 AM

I just took my high(est) round count unicorn frame apart for the first time to do a thorough cleaning.  I don't plan to do that more than once a year.



#11 Dr. Yellow Visor Guy

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:39 AM

I'm lazy as well, so cleaning is usually hosing the gun down in CLP, letting it soak in for a few minutes, then blasting the CLP and crud out with an air compressor.

The tanfos do get kinda gritty quick.
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#12 ny32182

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:43 AM

One weird thing I've noticed about mine is that my primary/high round count gun doesn't really have the trigger change when it gets a little dirty... it doesn't run quite as fast, but the trigger stays virtually unchanged.

 

My backup gun that gets shot far less has the takeup get gritty when it gets a little dirty. My totally non-expert opinion is that the plunger/trigger bar interface is the culprit, and needs to be either tweaked a little, or further broken in through more shooting.



#13 ny32182

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:46 AM

I got some Cudalube in a match pack this year and am planning to try it out as well just to see if I can use it for everything... I currently use slide glide on the rails, and runny oil on the barrel.  I don't lube anything in the lower except whatever hoppes is left in there after a regular cleaning/wipe down.



#14 Twinkie

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 08:54 AM

Maybe that's why I am no GM? Too much cleaning?

I think my trigger pull was getting worser because I over-lubed it and the products of combustion adhered causing gritty feeling.

Seeing the champ's gun that was dry as a bone made me re-think my protocol. Less lube may be gooder.

#15 Dr. Yellow Visor Guy

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 09:23 AM

There may be something to that - I tend to run them pretty wet.

#16 LeadChucker

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 09:45 AM

There may be something to that - I tend to run them pretty wet.


Me too, I always thought wet was better

#17 Flexmoney

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 12:07 PM

After reading too much of this thread, I'm left feeling Tanfos are high maintenance and pain to tear down? 


Unless otherwise noted, expect that all my posting here is in true Doodie fashion.  If my post somehow upsets your sensibilities, well...there ya go.  


#18 ny32182

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 12:51 PM

After mine have been put together right, maintenance has consisted of changing the recoil spring occasionally.

 

Tearing them down is definitely not Glock-easy, but doable for sure even if you are not necessarily mechanically inclined.  Basically the same as a CZ.



#19 dels

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 01:32 PM

There may be something to that - I tend to run them pretty wet.


Yeah, I thought these guns and their CZ cousins liked to be run wet as well.

#20 Twinkie

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 02:53 PM

Tearing it down isn't the big problem- it's that roll pins suck, wear out, and mask shitty parts fit. I put in a Henning trigger pin with the torx head and a nut because I was tired of pounding the roll pin out and lining everything up when getting it back in. Now it's just use slave pin for TRS, push slave pin out with punch once trigger aligned in frame, then push punch out with Henning pin. What could be simpler? /sarc

 

I also love putting the plunger back in and getting the mag catch to engage it. That's why i settled on a non-clicky 19lb plunger spring, also from Henning.

 

I've not changed the 9lb recoil spring yet. Prob 10K+ rounds through the gun. Is it time? 

 

Compared the EG hammer spring while I had the gun apart to a new one I have lying around - prob 1/4" shorter. Still GTG.

 

Next year I might get new mag springs. This year prob just buy 5 mags to use for matches and rotate the most beat-up to be dry-fire onry.

 

Why do people think guns should be run wet, or dry? Tightness of fit? Tightness of what fit exactly? My theory is if the slide to frame fit is super-tight, you could use some lube to reduce friction. Barrel seems a good idea as well. Not sure what else is necessary.

 

I remember a line from a Sig armorer's class where they said what to lube- if it's shiny, lube it. I personally used to do that.







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