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Notes from the ludus


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#1 Stubb

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 08:15 AM

Several of the mini-stages from Sunday's practice and the rationale behind them. Two of the themes were mixing together fast & tight shots and wide transitions. Dry-fire transition work is definitely paying off, but gotta get faster tearing through the close targets.

 

1. Table start to a partial followed by wide transitions to open targets. The open target was visible while advancing to the port, then settle down and shoot the six-chicken at 15 yards.

 

2. Oddball start onto close partials followed by three widely spaced targets (open, A-zone steel, open) through a port. Run to the other shooting area, hammer the close target, then transition to the six-chicken at ~17 yards.

 

3. A bunch of close-range targets and movement to start, then shoot the six-chicken coming into the last position, pop the A-zone steel at ~17 yards, and transition hard onto the close, open target to finish.

 

4. Burn through a mix of close open & partial targets, take the partial through the low port, work the wide transitions through the port, then flip & catch.

 


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#2 GuanoLoco

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 09:28 AM

Great shooting base, very consistent.  This is an area I need to improve.


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#3 Stubb

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 04:30 PM

How can I keep missing steel when it's RIGHT FUCKING THERE!

 

The disturbing part in all this is that I had a couple high primers, and the front sight jerked downward when the hammer fell but the gun didn't go bang. Misses on the plate rack were generally low. It didn't feel like I was jerking the gun when it went bang, but damn.

 

Not sure how much of this is due to the lack of mental prep for practice runs compared to match ones.

 


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#4 Twinkie

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 10:59 PM

Need to make practice more like matches? I have some ideas.
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#5 Stubb

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 10:50 AM

Started off at 25 yards with Bill Drills, El Presidentes, and Four Aces. Only a couple Ds, but way too many Cs. I know that I should be able to shoot mostly As on these drills. I realized that I've been getting sloppy in the sight pictures I'm accepting on simulated long-range shots in my dry-fire ludus, and that's carrying over into live fire. Gotta fix that shit.

 

SHO and WHO drills went okay. I was pushing speed and not flipping out over the Cs.

 

The six-target drill at the end really pushed transitions and gun handling. Speed and accuracy here seemed a direct function of how hard I gripped down on the pistol with my weak hand. I'm naturally gripping hard, but clamping down to the next level drastically smoothed out the sight picture.

 


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#6 Stubb

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 06:36 PM

Broke in some MGM knock-over 6"x6" squares and 8" plates today. Shooting these targets at 20–25 yards under time pressure was absolutely humiliating. I found that most of my misses were due to poor trigger control, particularly not isolating the motion to my index finger and milking the trigger. On good runs, I found myself being mindful of only bending a single joint in my index finger (the second knuckle, proximal interphalangeal joint) when it was time to fire.

 


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#7 Stubb

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 05:15 AM

Practice on Fluffy's Revenge 2 followed by incorporating the plates into position entries and exits. The train wrecks were less spectacular and frequent thanks to heavy dry-fire focus during the week on pulling the trigger straight back and not milking the grip. Shots simply felt different when I was paying attention. A side benefit was shooting ~75% As on the six chicken and never putting one into the no-shoot. My first shot on a turning draw needs serious work.

 



#8 Stubb

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 07:04 AM

Won a local match despite a pair of jams costing me beaucoup match points. Shooting the MGM 6” and 8” knock-over plates at 20–25 yards is paying off big time despite (or perhaps because of) soaking my crying towel when I took them out last weekend for the first time. But toward the end of the day, I realized that my trigger pull was not straight back and that I was also tightening my middle and ring fingers when pulling it. Becoming mindful of that in dry fire the following week has started transferring to live fire. It was great hitting stages full of partials and steel with confidence. Next step is to pick up the pace! Transitions are coming along nicely.

 


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#9 ToddKS

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 07:42 AM

I see Jack Suber has already been to your range and handed out the turtle targets. Always good to be ahead of the curve on such things.

What was the story on the second malfunction. Looked like a long time before you set to clearing the gun?

#10 Stubb

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 08:07 AM

What was the story on the second malfunction. Looked like a long time before you set to clearing the gun?

 

That was a classifier stage—Fluffy's Revenge 2. The malf was my second of the day, and I stood there for a few seconds thinking "goddamned bastard motherfucker" before reloading and finishing up the stage. I would have been on that shit immediately if it was a field course.

 

Here's the reshoot, which didn't count since the targets were set up improperly. Would have been around 90% (3.6 s, 7 A, 1 C).

 



#11 Stubb

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 07:09 AM

Got a lot of mileage out of an array with three tuxedos, the idea being to work on not sweeping the targets but instead indexing on each one. Also did a lot of shooting on a pair of upper-A-zone partials at 20 yards that would penalize milking the grip and anticipating recoil. I caught myself doing both at various times but generally stopped myself before dropping the hammer.

 

Among other things, I need to work on shooting arrays in field courses as fast as I'd shoot them as stand-alone drills. That became particularly evident when comparing the freestyle run on the tuxedos at 7 yards with shooting them earlier as a drill. I'm snapping my head to the next target on wide transitions but not on the smaller ones here. Good news was not using my crying towel nearly as much on the plates and only rage quitting two or three times.

 


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#12 howmanytimesitshoot

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 09:52 PM

Got a lot of mileage out of an array with three tuxedos, the idea being to work on not sweeping the targets but instead indexing on each one. Also did a lot of shooting on a pair of upper-A-zone partials at 20 yards that would penalize milking the grip and anticipating recoil. I caught myself doing both at various times but generally stopped myself before dropping the hammer.

Among other things, I need to work on shooting arrays in field courses as fast as I'd shoot them as stand-alone drills. That became particularly evident when comparing the freestyle run on the tuxedos at 7 yards with shooting them earlier as a drill. I'm snapping my head to the next target on wide transitions but not on the smaller ones here. Good news was not using my crying towel nearly as much on the plates and only rage quitting two or three times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmSvLvWWpCg


I do believe I'll be using some tuxedos in this manner. This is exactly my number one weak spot right now.(outside of movement)

#13 not that bryan

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 03:44 PM

Got a lot of mileage out of an array with three tuxedos, the idea being to work on not sweeping the targets but instead indexing on each one. Also did a lot of shooting on a pair of upper-A-zone partials at 20 yards that would penalize milking the grip and anticipating recoil. I caught myself doing both at various times but generally stopped myself before dropping the hammer.

Among other things, I need to work on shooting arrays in field courses as fast as I'd shoot them as stand-alone drills. That became particularly evident when comparing the freestyle run on the tuxedos at 7 yards with shooting them earlier as a drill. I'm snapping my head to the next target on wide transitions but not on the smaller ones here. Good news was not using my crying towel nearly as much on the plates and only rage quitting two or three times.


The Hopkins drill has helped me focus on snapping my vision to the next target, or more correctly to a specific spot on the next target.

#14 Stubb

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Posted 30 May 2015 - 04:21 PM

Lots of grip and trigger-control focused practice today involving drawing down on hard partials and shooting small steel targets. My weak-hand grip is getting where it needs to be based on it tearing skin off the back of my strong hand. The partials destroyed me at the beginning of the day, but there were glimmers of adequacy by the middle and nearly consistent As with a C or two by the end. Going one-for-one on the steel is getting to be a regular occurrence.

 

I'm getting a much stronger sense of my weak hand serving as a vice and my strong hand providing less of the control and mostly running the trigger. This has helped my splits, and I'm regularly getting under 0.2 s on close, open targets.

 

The mini stage in the second half of the video had a hit factor around five, and I think it's worth taking the extra time to punch As on the close head-shot-only target vs. two quick shots that are likely to both be Bs. At a hit factor of five, each point is worth 0.2 seconds, so spending up to 0.4 s bumping a B to an A pays off.

 

Also broke in a new set of Mec-Gar 17-round magazines with Pro Shop base pads. They worked flawlessly for today's 535 rounds fired. Round count on the Accu-Shadow is at 36,323.

 


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#15 Stubb

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 08:53 PM

Practicing gripping the gun hard with my weak hand, pulling the trigger straight back, and not letting grip tension shift to my strong hand while working through arrays paid off in lots of Alphas and going one-for-one on steel in several stages. Main problems were putting shots into the barrels (two misses for the day) and not snapping my head to the next target on medium transitions. I think that I'm transitioning faster when the next target is over 90 degrees away then when it's 45. So hooray for small victories. The shoot-house stage was a goddamned mess due to inadequate visualization of the stage beforehand.

 


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#16 Twinkie

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 08:55 PM

You shot 95% like a boss.
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#17 LeadChucker

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 09:20 AM

Thumbs upfor the 95%
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#18 Stubb

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Posted 15 June 2015 - 09:08 PM

Lots of dry-fire the previous focusing on smoothing out the herky-jerky movement in the previous week's match video and keeping a vice-like weak-hand grip while running the trigger smoothly with my weak hand. It's all paying off, both in saving time with smoother positions entries/exits and needing far fewer make-up shots on steel. I'm also trying to stand more upright vs. leaning forward and turtling. Main problem of the day was pulling shots low into hard cover due to sloppy aiming and pre-ignition flinch. Grip harder! Round count for the day was 528. These clips were filmed with my Olympus EM-5 and turned out quite poorly. Autoexposure was all over the place and many clips were ruined by focus hunting. First and last video outing for that camera. In practice, my iPhone 4s does a better job.  
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#19 GuanoLoco

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Posted 15 June 2015 - 11:33 PM

Looking sharp.
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Are you now, or have you ever been a member of the Doodie Project?

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#20 Stubb

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Posted 17 June 2015 - 08:16 PM

It's fun to periodically watch old shooting videos to keep apprised of progress. Here are two match stages shot about 22 months apart. Hat hasn't changed!

 


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