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need some movement help


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#1 Yard Sale

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 12:40 PM

I need some drills and exercises for moving into and out of positions. What have you got? Live fire, dry fire, or no fire.

 

I'm old and fat with short legs. This is how I look on a field course:

 

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#2 waktasz

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 01:14 PM

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#3 Motosapiens

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 01:21 PM

variations of anderson's 'call it and leave it drill' (dryfire and occasional live fire) has been helping me, but I suck far more than you do.


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#4 Flexmoney

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 01:26 PM

move how you need to move


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#5 Shithead23

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 03:00 PM

Crossfit mothafucka!


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#6 Vagetarian

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 03:11 PM

Find a police dog and strap meat to your junk.  You'll move.


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#7 busdriver

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 03:25 PM

I set up two dry fire targets on opposite ends of a short hallway and basically run wind sprints between them with a par time for down and back.  The hallway acts as a vision barrier and a fault line depending on where you put the targets.  

 

But I'm a dregs of B class schlub, so take that for what you paid for it.



#8 Sweet T

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 03:28 PM

variations of anderson's 'call it and leave it drill' (dryfire and occasional live fire) has been helping me, but I suck far more than you do.

 

This is a staple in my dry fire training.



#9 Larry Costa

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 09:45 PM

This Anderson drill seems pretty cool.  Somebody please share.  I don't remember it from when I took his class a few years ago.


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#10 J.A.Nine

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 06:13 AM

MFCEO had a similar drill in his class: steel plate, barrel stack, paper, paper, paper, barrel stack, steel plate. Start at one end, shoot steel, shoot paper on the move, shoot steel. Vary the order or way you shoot the paper as you run back and forth.


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#11 Flexmoney

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 07:44 AM

Have you thought of dance classes?  


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#12 Woodieproject

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 08:12 AM

I've done that. Helps to score big points very fast. 


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#13 Motosapiens

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 08:40 AM

This Anderson drill seems pretty cool.  Somebody please share.  I don't remember it from when I took his class a few years ago.

 

his basic version is 2 shooting boxes 6' apart, 1 steel plate (i use 10" at 10 yards). run from box to box, shooting (and calling) 1 shot at the plate each time. I made it 2 shots on the steel because I needed work on my grip and shot calling on the 2nd shot. 

 

I usually start in one box, draw as I'm moving to the other, and then go back and forth for 5 shooting positions (10 shots) since that's what my gun holds. One of the things that is valuable is the back and forth multiple times. It helps me get into a rhythm and figure out what movement styles work best, and helps me remember to stay low in movement and start quieting my upper body as I'm entering the box to be able to get a good sight picture earlier.

 

you can also do it ports or shooting around walls, or add some other targets in for whatever you want to work on. For me the fundamental component is at least 5-6 movements on each rep. 

this will also get your heart rate up a little bit and may count as exercise.


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#14 GuanoLoco

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 09:13 AM

I like it at 4 yards with a full magazine and after being run multiple times is is most assuredly exercise.

I like the varied distance, e.g. 6'/2 yard approach though, and think I may try it with 2 shots on 1 8" steel, or maybe 2 separate 8" plates @ 10 yards next time.
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#15 ThumblessKorean

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 09:38 AM

 

no fire Moving in & out drill here.



#16 Motosapiens

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 10:10 AM

I think drills without a gun may be valuable for some people, but I would prefer to do the same thing while holding a gun. For many folks, athleticism isn't the problem, lots of us have a sports background and are pretty good at moving back and forth quickly. However, until you practice for a bit, people tend to be more hesitant and less explosive while holding a gun. I also find it helpful to work on reloading and muzzle control during some of these drills. Yet another thing to consider is the sight picture as you are setting up.... trying to get on the sights early requires a different technique than lunging to beat a soccer opponent to the ball.

 

Fortunately I live in a state where no one really cares if I run agility drills with a gun, although if I were doing them at the school playground I would use an airsoft gun or a blue training gun.


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#17 NickBlasta

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 01:37 PM

Call it and leave it is one of my favorite drills too. It teaches position entry and exit but also shot calling. I like to use poppers set to not fall over, so that it also teaches you not to wait for steel feedback. Run to one box, shoot as soon as you can, call the shot and leave immediately without waiting for feedback. Repeat till you get tired or run out of ammo.

 

 

 

I think drills without a gun may be valuable for some people, but I would prefer to do the same thing while holding a gun. For many folks, athleticism isn't the problem, lots of us have a sports background and are pretty good at moving back and forth quickly. However, until you practice for a bit, people tend to be more hesitant and less explosive while holding a gun. I also find it helpful to work on reloading and muzzle control during some of these drills. Yet another thing to consider is the sight picture as you are setting up.... trying to get on the sights early requires a different technique than lunging to beat a soccer opponent to the ball.

 

Fortunately I live in a state where no one really cares if I run agility drills with a gun, although if I were doing them at the school playground I would use an airsoft gun or a blue training gun.

 

You're right in that most people can move pretty quick, but I see mostly they have a problem with knowing the best kind of movement for the stage. By that, I mean short steps. Look up at busdriver's post about doing sprints. Lots of people like to long-step it around the course because they think long steps are fast but when you make the switch to a lot of short steps it will really improve your times and position entry/exit.



#18 Motosapiens

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 03:33 PM

You're right in that most people can move pretty quick, but I see mostly they have a problem with knowing the best kind of movement for the stage. By that, I mean short steps. Look up at busdriver's post about doing sprints. Lots of people like to long-step it around the course because they think long steps are fast but when you make the switch to a lot of short steps it will really improve your times and position entry/exit.

 

You sure about that? I have run some timed tests and the longer I step, the faster I guy. Nils seems to be a long-stepping guy also (and he and I are built similarly).


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#19 ThumblessKorean

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 03:57 PM

I think long vs short step doesn't matter.

 

Whoever starts engaging sooner will shoot faster time on the timer.



#20 Yard Sale

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 04:22 PM

I think long vs short step doesn't matter.

 

Whoever starts engaging sooner will shoot faster time on the timer.

 

Whoever leaves first and engages sooner be faster. I have found that the setup costs more time (i.e. potentially saves more time) than the exit. On the exit all you can do is lean toward the new position while engaging the last target, and avoid a Snagglepuss exit.

 

exit-stage-left-snagglepuss-o.gif

 

But getting into position and getting that first shot off, well that's where you can pick up a lot of time.


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