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Darkening the Zone Lines in Practice?


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#1 TRBDN

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 08:15 AM

Yesterday I was working transitions in dry fire using the standard 3 target array at a simulated 15 yards.  The targets I was using had the A zone box lines darkened with a black pen.  I did this to make it easier to reference where my sights were as I sped through the drill. 

 

It got me thinking, is there any value to darkening the lines (Sharpie) for drills over 15 yards, at least for the first session with a new drill?  Obviously it wouldn't be something you always want to do, but I did see some value in dry fire yesterday.  I am thinking it might help your timing without going full blown accuracy/bullseye mode.

 

Thoughts? 


Games are won by players who focus on the playing field; not by those whose eyes are glued to the scoreboard - Warren Buffett

 

I'm here to improve my match performance, not to impress you.


#2 not that bryan

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 08:37 AM

I have darkened the letter A in the center of the target on some of my dry fire targets. I did it to work on visually focusing on the absolute center of the target during transitions.

It seems to work well and makes it easier for me to tell when I get lazy with my visual focus and just driving the gun to brown.

#3 waktasz

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 08:52 AM

Yesterday I was working transitions in dry fire using the standard 3 target array at a simulated 15 yards.  The targets I was using had the A zone box lines darkened with a black pen.  I did this to make it easier to reference where my sights were as I sped through the drill. 

 

It got me thinking, is there any value to darkening the lines (Sharpie) for drills over 15 yards, at least for the first session with a new drill?  Obviously it wouldn't be something you always want to do, but I did see some value in dry fire yesterday.  I am thinking it might help your timing without going full blown accuracy/bullseye mode.

 

Thoughts? 

 

I would think a black piece of tape in the center of the A would be more valuable. You aren't trying to hit the lines, you are trying to hit the middle.

 

That being said....I am going to try this.



#4 aceinyerface

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 09:04 AM

I trace my USPSA dryfire targets on larger pieces of cardboard. Initially I drew in the A zone. I stopped because it was giving me something artificial to look at.

 

I needed to be able to recognize that the width of the head is the width of the A zone and the top of the A zone is the break of the shoulder and use that to guide my vision.

 

Of course, I still suck... so...


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#5 TRBDN

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 09:09 AM

I needed to be able to recognize that the width of the head is the width of the A zone and the top of the A zone is the break of the shoulder and use that to guide my vision.

 

 

 

Brilliant.  So simple and obvious, yet I have never thought about it like that.  I feel like kicking myself now...


Games are won by players who focus on the playing field; not by those whose eyes are glued to the scoreboard - Warren Buffett

 

I'm here to improve my match performance, not to impress you.


#6 TRBDN

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 09:14 AM

I have darkened the letter A in the center of the target on some of my dry fire targets.

 

 

I would think a black piece of tape in the center of the A would be more valuable.

 

I think the lines would benefit your training of make up shots; knowing the difference between A's vs close C's. 

 

Of course someone with 20/15 vision can probably see the lines anyway. 


Games are won by players who focus on the playing field; not by those whose eyes are glued to the scoreboard - Warren Buffett

 

I'm here to improve my match performance, not to impress you.


#7 mx5

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 10:30 AM

When I am sighting in, testing loads, working on accuracy, etc., I'll use dots, tape. etc. When practicing transitions, movement, etc., I just use the target. When training my vision (draws, transitions, etc.) I also use the metric target shape, popper shape, etc. in original and/or reduced size without additional points of aim. In practice, I want to see the same thing I expect to see in a match. FWIW, using tape. etc. on a routine basis might result in "over aiming". YMMV.


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#8 BHill

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 09:49 PM

Instead of darkening the lines I will use no shoots on the sides to highlight the A zone. Along with raising the pucker factor I'm a firm believer that practicing with a large amount of no shoots will enable you to quit looking at them and therefore quit shooting them.


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#9 not that bryan

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 07:30 AM

Instead of darkening the lines I will use no shoots on the sides to highlight the A zone. Along with raising the pucker factor I'm a firm believer that practicing with a large amount of no shoots will enable you to quit looking at them and therefore quit shooting them.


I use a variety of no shoots and hard cover targets in dry fire and live fire. I spend half my practice in live fire and a little less than half of dry fire with partials.

I am currently using more hard cover because it is harder for me to tell when the sight drifts into black hardcover than it is to tell when it drifts into a white no-shoot.

I don't use partials for everything because I don't want to get lazy with my visual focus. If I let my visual focus get lazy and not drive the gun to a specific spot on the target I end up shooting good groups in the C zone.
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#10 BHill

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 09:59 AM

I use a variety of no shoots and hard cover targets in dry fire and live fire. I spend half my practice in live fire and a little less than half of dry fire with partials.

I am currently using more hard cover because it is harder for me to tell when the sight drifts into black hardcover than it is to tell when it drifts into a white no-shoot.

I don't use partials for everything because I don't want to get lazy with my visual focus. If I let my visual focus get lazy and not drive the gun to a specific spot on the target I end up shooting good groups in the C zone.

I use the no shoots because I'm to lazy to paint up hard cover targets for practice.  I hadn't thought about losing the sight in the hard cover. I'll have to work with that in practice now.



#11 not that bryan

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 06:18 PM

I use the no shoots because I'm to lazy to paint up hard cover targets for practice. I hadn't thought about losing the sight in the hard cover. I'll have to work with that in practice now.


I taped up a bunch of 1/3 scale targets with black duct tape. If I were doing it over I'd just get some black construction paper and cut it to fit. That way I could change the hard cover easier.
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#12 Miculek is a Noob

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 08:36 AM

Brilliant.  So simple and obvious, yet I have never thought about it like that.  I feel like kicking myself now...

 

Take the Level 1 RO class. How do you think some guys are so quick at scoring targets?

 

 

 

Of course someone with 20/15 vision can probably see the lines anyway. 

 

We throw their ass out of the sport if they can see lines more than 11 yards away -- 4.2.2

 

(One of the dumbest rules in the book)






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