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Your Mental Program


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#1 Race taco's brother

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 06:05 PM

I have been working through the ideas in Lanny Bassham's Book, With Winning in Mind. I'm making progress, but if you have read this book you understand how challenging it can be.

What is your Mental Program? What are you doing to focus your thoughts, feelings, and actions?

Thanks

#2 racetaco

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 07:08 PM

1. Have fun enjoy myself
2. Snacks
3. Try and be better than you

# three is basically impossible now, but it’s still good motivation

#3 AMNS

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 10:04 PM

The most significant thing for me was to make sure my expectations / self image were aligned with my level of participation and commitment.  Set your goals, develop a plan, commit to it.  Be extremely disciplined.

 

Luckily have had very few mental issues during actual performance.



#4 Motosapiens

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:29 PM

i've never read the book, but many of the ideas as explained by steve anderson make sense to me. In general, my mental game for sports and life has always been just trying to be better tomorrow than I am today. I rarely set lofty goals like I want to be president or production national champion. I always set small specific goals, like I want to make M class in Limited, and after that I'll switch that goal to GM.

 

I don't really have any problem focusing my thoughts, feeling or actions. I've always been pretty obsessive about whatever sport I'm competing in (enduro and mtb/cyclocross before shooting).

 

Can't stress enough the importance of shot-calling and letting your vision dictate your speed. To do that, you have to trust your training, and be confident that calling every shot will result in the best and most consistent scores you can get.


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#5 Woodieproject

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 07:47 PM

 

What is your Mental Program? 

 

5 mg of Adderall 30 min before dry fire to help with distractions, 0.25-0.5 mg of Xanax before matches or else I'll panic, and Wellbutrin XL 150 daily to cope with results.


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#6 benchmstr

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 09:35 PM

I shot international trap and skeet since I was 9, and have shot on the world stage since I was 12..i have shot all over the world in rifle, pistol, and shotgun

 

I have competed in surfing, powerlifting, triathlons..basically anything you can think of.

 

I will not have a hobby that I can NOT compete in..

 

my mental program is simply having competition



#7 SlivGod

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 11:47 AM

Which scope of mental program are you contemplating? 

There's the broad scope that encompasses the day-to-day, "big picture" mentality. 

There's a more narrow scope that encompasses game day and match management. 

Then there's the very narrow scope of getting ready to lay down a performance (I think Bassham frequently uses the "Execute" example). 


"Forget the necessities, it's the luxuries I can't live without." 


#8 Race taco's brother

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 02:15 PM

SlivGod

I have my "big picture" under control. It is pretty much making decisions that will help me reach my goal. Avoiding negativity and pursuing positivity.

I'm getting there with my game day and match management. Simple ideas that were mentioned in "how to handle the waiting" helped a lot over the weekend. I tried to be friendlier. Chit chat about whatever. Staying busy with running the match and fiddling with my gear, snacking.

I'm having a tough time with what I'm thinking and how I'm feeling On Deck and On The Line. I am capable of some very high levels of shooting, but it's inconsistent. I had a Steel Match on Sunday. First stage of the day was Smoke and Hope. In the hole I focused on my emotions. Telling my self that I feel good. I'm loose. On deck I visualized the stage seeing what I need to see, just shooting it loose 1 for 1. On the line I focused as hard as I could on just being loose. I was done shooting before I even new it and I felt very good about it. It felt right.

In later stages I tried thinking the same things, but my mind was racing so bad I had a hard time. On harder stages I was trying put my focus on shooting the center of the plate. No luck. Over thinking on the line, doubt, frustration....

I know I should be crushing these matches, but I'm just not letting myself. I was curious what others were doing in the hole, on deck, and on the line to stay cool and shoot to their potential. What you are thinking, when, and why.

#9 waktasz

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 07:30 PM

Heard this quote the other day and loved it. Going to adapt it into my mental game at matches when dealing with shitty weather or dopey squadmates or stages that seem gay

 

 

 

starts at 1:39



#10 Race taco's brother

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 06:11 AM

I would guess that upper level performers in all sports share this attitude. If you believe you have an advantage, you have an advantage.

#11 SlivGod

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:01 AM

 I was curious what others were doing in the hole, on deck, and on the line to stay cool and shoot to their potential. What you are thinking, when, and why.

Damn. That's a loaded question. But, I'll do my best.

 

In the hole: Muffs go on (I double up). My attention switches almost-exclusively to stage visualization. I keep enough conscious thought to paste a couple nearby targets. 

On deck: I walk away from the line, face away, close my eyes, and spend all of my mental energy on visualization. That's all I'm thinking about; I'm not watching, listening to, or thinking about anything but my visualization. 

On the line: Go through my Make Ready routine and clear my mind. I'm trying to switch into auto-pilot. From the time I take my hand off my gun until the buzzer, I've cleared my thoughts and feelings; I'm internally chanting "Grip hard, shoot alphas." 

 

I've personally found a clear mind is better at "go time" than trying to actively encourage myself mentally. 


"Forget the necessities, it's the luxuries I can't live without." 


#12 Race taco's brother

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:36 AM

Sliv

I really like it. Auto-pilot is what I am after. I am going to work off of your example.
I put together a similar strategy and tried it out in practice yesterday. In the hole I tried to focus my feelings on how I wanted them to be. How I feel after I perform well. On deck I visualized perfect runs. On the line I simplified my load and make ready and kept repeating the same thought over and over. In and out, in and out. I'm hopeful with some work I can pull it together.

In training how often do you practice this mental routine?
Does it ever vary or is it pretty set in stone?

Thanks for your reply

#13 SlivGod

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:44 AM

In training how often do you practice this mental routine?
Does it ever vary or is it pretty set in stone?
 

1. That was one of the greatest improvements I made in training. In both dryfire and live fire, I use the same chant. I don't use the other portions. However, I do keep a TV on while dryfiring; one reason for that is to act as a distraction like background conversation would be at a match. Occasionally, I find myself paying too much attention to the TV. I then have to take a moment to get back into Go Mode. 

 

2. At a match, it never varies when I have a say in the matter. The only variation is -obviously- what I'm visualizing. That said, shit happens. At Nats, I had two stages where variation was forced upon me (a surprise reshoot, and having to switch stages on a "split" bay for no apparent reason). In those instances, I just extended my On the Line method because I did not have the hole or on deck prep.


"Forget the necessities, it's the luxuries I can't live without." 


#14 Race taco's brother

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:59 AM

Comsistent and repeatable.

In one of Stoeger's books he says something like-
If you think you are one little trick away from being great, your not. I disagree. I feel like this is "the trick" to get me where I want to go.

Thank you
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#15 Peally

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 01:30 PM

Sliv you're too nice.

 

In the hole: Fuck pasting, fuck scoring, fuck everything but making sure my mags are all where they need to be. Start mentally running through stage as I wait.

 

On deck: Personal walkthroughs on stage, sprinkled with politely telling people to get the flying fuck out of the way while I do. Plan should already be figured out by now, just going through the motions.

 

On the line: Mind is relaxed, once make ready is given I load up, keep my hand on the gun and mentally go through the stage one last time, then assume the position.

 

 

 

Unless there's a wrench thrown in the process this stays the same for every stage, rushing at the make ready will screw you and only you. Encouraging yourself or whatever else involving heavy thought on the line is counter productive beyond that subconscious "grip gud aim gud" stuff.


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#16 SlivGod

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 02:11 PM

Sliv you're too nice.

lol it's situation dependent. But, matches down by me typically have small enough squads that one person not pasting can make a huge difference. 

Also, it gets me away from the mouth-breathers that want to ask what recoil spring I'm using as I'm about to get ready.


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"Forget the necessities, it's the luxuries I can't live without." 


#17 Race taco's brother

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 02:15 PM

I did a ton of surrender draw training this winter. A ton. I experimented with where to put my focus and what results I could get. Loose hand speed, trigger prep, see the sights, relaxed shoulders. Whatever. I'm happy with the experimentation I did. I'm very happy with my draw.

Time to put the overthinking and experimentation away for the winter. No more driving down par times. Settle into a relaxed mindset, a simple and repeatable thought process. Work on my match mode.

Thank you guys
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#18 Motosapiens

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 03:15 PM

lol it's situation dependent. But, matches down by me typically have small enough squads that one person not pasting can make a huge difference. 

 

 

I sometimes reset when i'm in the hole or on deck for the same reason, and also to make sure the poppers are nice and light.


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#19 Peally

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 03:17 PM

Guess I was talking about "bigger" matches. If it's a weekly rinky dink 8 person club match and the stage is an El Pres then yeah I'll tape.



#20 SlivGod

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 05:51 PM

Guess I was talking about "bigger" matches. If it's a weekly rinky dink 8 person club match and the stage is an El Pres then yeah I'll tape.

Then no, at big matches, y'all can fuck off.


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"Forget the necessities, it's the luxuries I can't live without." 





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