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#61 Fishyjoe

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Posted 28 December 2018 - 07:18 PM

Year end review.

3 registered bird tournaments
57/100
64/100
75/100

2 registered side events
37/50
41/50 finished 2nd in both however not enough to earn a punch in either.

Happy to pick up nearly 20 birds since my 1st. Still need to be better. I finally know enough and am skilled enough to hit most shots. I’m executing the techniques I learned way back in September and have a decent “feel” for the shot. Consistency has gotten better although there is a lot of work left to be done on the mental side. I need to turn those 5s and 7s to 6s and 8s. I’d like to get another lesson in before May.

Things I learned

I really had no clue how to shoot clays. My gun was totally ill-fitting. Ammo makes a difference. Not in regards to performance at my skill level, but in how much more punishment is dished out. Cheap Walmart federals are fine in low doses, but in volume situations they will fuck you up!

Shot calling is a thing in sporting clays however there usually aren’t any makeup shots. Zeroing a stage is a thing too and the consequences are just as high.

Overall I think I’m getting closer to putting up a big boy score on register birds. I’ve done it on a few occasions in practice but not in a tournament yet.

Moving forward:

Simple. Get better and shoot more.

Learning how to practice was a major obstacle this year. There isn’t a Ben Stoeger in this game yet. There hasn’t been anyone to really breakdown the fundamentals and say here practice this and you will get gooder. I miss the free flowing information of the practical shooting world. I feel a lot of people in the business of shotgun teaching are snake oil salesmen. They act like they’re guarding the secrets of the Freemasons when it comes to information.

I’m going to shoot less registered birds and practice more. Registered birds are pricey, practice is less pricey. By the middle of January, I will have enough targets to enter major shoots.

Speaking of major shoots I want to shoot one this year. Although I hate doing so, I’m going to pass on the US Open that is less than 2 hours from the house. Instead I’m going to focus my efforts on the southeast regional in October. I can plan a small family getaway around it and I’ll have a solid month, un-interrupted, to prepare for it. May is a busy month for me.

Shoot a FITASC event. Apparently FITASC is where the heat is and the winners get all the cougar vag they can handle.

Better nutrition at and leading up to tournaments. Eyes are everything and dehydration affects vision. This will be more of an issue when I participate in a multi-day event.

Physical conditioning. Part of the reason I chose this hobby was to be able to get out and stretch my legs. It’s working. I always walk the course. While it’s been good for me, I’ve lost 25lbs since May, I find myself fatigued at the end of a long tournament day. A quick glance at score cards reveals my scores suffer because of it down the stretch. I’d like to drop another 25lbs this year. Couple that with building endurance by adding pace and distance to my normal walking routine, I should see an improvement.

Gear.

I’m pretty happy with my current set up. I will add a back up gun at some point in 2019. There is nothing I can change that will add more broken targets to my score at my skill level. If there is anything gear related that I’ll spend any amount of time on is shells. For the most part I’m paying $50-$60 a flat. I’d like to pay less. Unlike pistol shooting, reloading saves nothing so I’ll have to explore other options. I’ve shot just over 5k rounds since September. That puts my current volume at about 10k/yr. Right now, it’s looking like my options are find a few more volume shooters and share a pallet, or buy a pallet and get into the ammo sales business. Both are options with access to the shooters at my local club.

I’m looking forward to improving my game. My goal is to melt faces and break hearts short term. I’d like to HOA my state championship long term. We have a long way to go but I’m happy with the progress so far.

#62 Fishyjoe

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 09:46 AM

It’s been a while. Still banging away every chance I get. Current volume is about a flat a week over 2 sessions. Joining the club has cut target costs by more than half. That only means more shooting and no actual savings. So a win in my book. No registered birds this year yet. Frankly the the weather has been shitty unpredictable. I’ve canceled going to a couple of shoots because of it. I have no interest in tromping around in the mud and rain with an expensive shotgun.

Progress:

Since I haven’t shot registered, progress is subjective at best. During the winter trap league I averaged 23/25 from the 16 yard line and 21/25 from the 20 yard line. That is a significant improvement over a year ago but has no bearing on sporting clays.

I have noticed that my abilities to pick up the second target and make transitions has improved. Eye training has helped. Sheer volume has helped more. Nothing beats just doing something until you figure it out.

Banging away on the 5 stand gets boring so a lot of times I find myself trying different stuff just to push my limits and add to my menu of shots. I’m trying to learn how to shoot teal on the way up. I can say I get it but I’m not 100% confident in that ability yet and would likely steer away from it in competition.

Since I’m experimenting a lot, I tend not to tract results and focus on the process. Tracking results for a while might be in order as we head into the main competition season. I also want to focus on my mental preparation. I find myself drifting away especially on the “easier” stations where I should be stacking dead birds. Focusing on 3-4 pairs is the hardest part of sporting.

Moving forward:

I have certainly improved over the past year and even few months. I have a long way to go to get where I want to be. I want to get one decent local shoot in before summer, then I’m shifting my focus. 1st will be the Maryland State Shoot in Mid-September, then the South East Regional in early October. I’d like a class win at both of those events. I’m going to try and squad up with someone better than me at both of those events. I want to see how they do what they do and get some cheap passive lessons. After that I’ll hopefully get another formal lesson, and go over my results with her and see what direction she thinks we should move after that.

#63 Buck Turgidson

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 08:09 PM

"Stage planning" is even more important in sporting than it is in USPSA.

 

Being able to read the target lines and the coming up with a plan that works for you (visual pick up point, gun hold point, gun insertion zone, kill zone, transition to next target, etc) is huge and will dramatically improve your consistence IF you have the nads to shoot your plan and not change it midstream for no reason.

 

Commit to that break point and do not deviate, if it works.


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I need something to do while shooting, and thinking about titties is too distracting  - Stubb


#64 chachacha

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 01:05 PM

If you haven’t heard of it yet, check out the Behind the Break podcast. Lots of great discussions with the heavy hitters in the sporting clays world.
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#65 Fishyjoe

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 02:28 PM

If you haven’t heard of it yet, check out the Behind the Break podcast. Lots of great discussions with the heavy hitters in the sporting clays world.


It’s pretty good. I enjoy the banter, it reminds me of the Practical Pistol Show before it got boring as fuck with all the IPSC retards.
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#66 Fishyjoe

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 02:47 PM

"Stage planning" is even more important in sporting than it is in USPSA.

Being able to read the target lines and the coming up with a plan that works for you (visual pick up point, gun hold point, gun insertion zone, kill zone, transition to next target, etc) is huge and will dramatically improve your consistence IF you have the nads to shoot your plan and not change it midstream for no reason.

Commit to that break point and do not deviate, if it works.

I agree for the most part. What I have a hard time with is knowing when to trust the process and when to cut losses and try something different. For example, you call what you think is a good shot shift your eyes to the second bird only to hear the trapper say “Lost/Dead”. Did the target move? Did I flinch? What the fuck? Do I keep the same plan? Do I change? Next thing you know you’re all fucked up in your own brain.

#67 Buck Turgidson

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 05:18 PM

I agree for the most part. What I have a hard time with is knowing when to trust the process and when to cut losses and try something different. For example, you call what you think is a good shot shift your eyes to the second bird only to hear the trapper say “Lost/Dead”. Did the target move? Did I flinch? What the fuck? Do I keep the same plan? Do I change? Next thing you know you’re all fucked up in your own brain.

 

These are things you need to work out in practice.  But on game day, I've stopped the bleeding by analyzing my misses and changing something.  Knowing what to change comes from relentless self analysis and takes time and mileage.


I need something to do while shooting, and thinking about titties is too distracting  - Stubb





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