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#1 gentleman4561

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 07:03 PM

After reading over the range diaries of the local production heat I aspire to be one day, I felt it would be beneficial to start one my self.

 

As a bit of background, I started shooting IDPA in 2012 before quickly moving onto 3 gun. Since then I have primarily shot 3 gun and long range/sniper matches.

 

I had mild success in both but never focused hard enough on one or the other to reap the rewards of deliberate practice.

 

After winning a local sniper comp last November, the man who is essentially my shooting father/mentor had a conversation with me about my shooting. What he essentially said is that it is incredibly difficult to shoot so many different sports well and that I ought to focus on one specifically.  One of his children is a multiple-time national champ and member of the AMU, so he has a good idea of what he is talking about.  

 

After that conversation, I decided that I would make pistol shooting my primary focus. After all, I carry a handgun at all times and noticed that talented USPSA shooters generally performed well in 3 Gun.

 

At this time I had shot 3-4 USPSA matches, in limited minor with my 9mm 2011, but never pursued USPSA seriously.  It is not uncommon for my local matches to have 5+ Production GMs, so the decision to shoot production was an easy one to make, as I didn’t want to shoot a division that I would always win. 

 

I had an old Glock 34, but went ahead and got a CZ S2 as that seems to be what all the cool kids use. Looking back now, I think I would have better spent the $1500 I have in my Shadow 2 and gear on some high-level classes.  But, I am not disappointed with the S2.

 

So far my training has primarily come from Ben’s books. I did some googling upon deciding to shoot USPSA and saw that Ben has been a pretty dominant force, and figured I ought to be able to learn a lot from him.  I attribute the majority of my success to what I have learned from Ben’s books/podcast and advice I have received from a lot of our local production shooters.  

 

The only non-tactical timmy class I have taken was with Stubb (great class, shoot me a message if you want more details).

 

Since starting, I have been averaging 30 minutes of dry fire a day and 1 live fire training session a week along with weekly matches. 

 

I made it to A class pretty quickly, and am currently sitting at the edge of my 2018 goal of Master with 84%. 

 

My primary goal for 2018 is to become a Master class shooter, while also shooting at a master class level.

 

Tl;dr Started USPSA in early 2018 after a few years of bouncing around a mixture of shooting sports, learning a lot from Ben’s books, will be a Master class shooter by the end of 2018.

 

2018 Main Goals:

Make Master

Finish a major match above 85%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#2 gentleman4561

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 07:31 PM

Going to start tracking PRs

 

25yd Bill Drill - 3.66 5A 1C

Distance change up - 3.03 5A 1B

Bill drill

Blake drill

Accelerator

 

Fast drill 3.49


You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#3 Stubb

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 07:44 PM

Glad to see that you've started a range diary & looking forward to the updates.

 

You're already beating some M-class shooters, so no doubt your classification will catch up.


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#4 Peally

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 07:56 PM

Hiya. 85% can be pretty ballsy if someone like Gutt shows up, but it's definitely doable.



#5 gentleman4561

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 08:03 PM

Riverbend Gun Club June 2018 

 

Hiya. 85% can be pretty ballsy if someone like Gutt shows up, but it's definitely doable.

No doubt! It won't be easy.


You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#6 gentleman4561

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 08:22 PM

Riverbend Gun Club - June 2018 Monthy Match

 

 

Backdating my diary a bit with some June highlights.

 

To sum my performance up at this match, poor.

 

I started the day on Stage 8 with 2 mikes and continued to rack up penalties over the remainder of the day for a total of  6 mikes and 1 no shoot. Add to that a botched reload on Stage 1(slide lock reload, dropped slide before mag was all the way in), my day was off to a pretty crappy start and I think I let it get into my head.

 

Notable things I learned/will work on:

 

1. SHO/WHO - The classifier was quite the disaster, the strong hand went ok. Weak hand was essentially an AD into the first target (hit the stick low right, mike) which I carried with me into target two and threw another mike. I hate practicing one handed shooting and have seriously neglected it. Since this match, I have added 10-15 min of SHO/WHO into my dry fire 3-4 times a week. 

 

2. Reloads - My reloads are still bad. I have been averaging around 75 reloads a day for the past month and while they are slowly improving, they still stink. I found myself waiting on the gun to have ammo before I could start shooting, and that is never fun. 

 

3. Verify stage descriptions/pay more attention - On stage 4, a no-shoot popper was in an array...and I didn't see it.  It was covered at the match brief, but my dumb self-was still walking shooters. As Murphy's law would have it, I was first shooter on that stage and drilled the NS steel.  

 

4. Build confidence on paper on the move - I found myself taking more makeup shots than needed when shooting paper on the move. I need to work on calling my shots like I do if static. I used to do the same with partials, but Stubb told me I needed to start "shooting fearlessly". I took that to heart and have been generally smashing partials, the same confidence needs building for paper on the move.

 

5. Swingers - While I have been practicing swingers heavily, and no longer fear them...they still need deliberate practice. I am often lazy in practice, as swingers are a pain to haul out and set up, but that won't be allowed anymore.

 

6. Get low - My 6'4 self-loves to stand up as tall and straight as possible when shooting. Any advice on ways to practice this would be appreciated. 


You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#7 Stubb

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 09:50 AM

6. Get low - My 6'4 self-loves to stand up as tall and straight as possible when shooting. Any advice on ways to practice this would be appreciated. 

 

I think this one is a slow bleed on your stage times in that it's biting you in both movement and transitions. It's pretty clear in stage 1. A good bend in the knees will let you transition wider without having to move your feet, which wastes time. Near term, use the walk-through as an opportunity to try out foot placement in different shooting positions. Eventually it will come naturally.

 

Initially, if you feel like you're getting too low, you're almost low enough.



#8 SlivGod

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 10:40 AM

In response to 6, see Hwansik's stance. He's about your height and uses it to his advantage.

"Forget the necessities, it's the luxuries I can't live without." 


#9 Stubb

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 10:59 AM

In response to 6, see Hwansik's stance. He's about your height and uses it to his advantage.

 

Interesting idea. See also Nils Jonasson. His footwork is efficient, but you can see that he does short moves slightly differently than short dudes.



#10 gentleman4561

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 08:48 PM

Interesting idea. See also Nils Jonasson. His footwork is efficient, but you can see that he does short moves slightly differently than short dudes.

 

 

In response to 6, see Hwansik's stance. He's about your height and uses it to his advantage.

 

Both guys I have been watching, Nils especially. 

 

Lots to be learned.


You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#11 gentleman4561

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 08:52 PM

Started off my dryfire with a draw, shoot 3 paper (simulated 10-yard metrics) while backing up, reload and move about 4 yards into an array of a simulated 10-yard metric and 4 poppers with a minor lean.

 

Reviewing more match video I find that I tend to move slower than I should during short movements, so I intend to improve that.

 

All draws came from surrender, as that's a weak spot for me. Continuing to make progress on these. 


You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#12 BenB

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Posted 03 July 2018 - 06:59 PM

6. Get low - My 6'4 self-loves to stand up as tall and straight as possible when shooting. Any advice on ways to practice this would be appreciated. 

 

This is what just comes to mind:

 

Set up a drill that tricks you in to doing it, so you get used to stopping it and preventing it. Something like two barricades 5y apart. Start 3y back and between them. One medium-hard target (10-15y partial) on each side, so you want to set up tall and stable.

 

Run to the left side of the left barricade, and let yourself set up. Feel yourself standing up like you're riding an escalator. Shoot the target. Run to the right side of the right barricade and shoot around it. Feel as you leave P1 yourself "riding the escalator" back down and "riding the escalator" back up at P2. Do that a few times to really feel what it feels like when you start to stand up and penalty you pay every time you leave position. I think this drill should work fine live or dry fire. Just don't 1/3rd scale the movement distance, of course.

 

Then start focusing on noticing the feeling of riding the escalator up, and just stop and shoot from where you are. Keep your low stance. It might be too narrow, but fuck it, that's the cost of progress. Get used to shooting low. As you do it more, you'll naturally want to widen out your stance. Allow that to happen. But if you ever feel yourself riding the escalator up, freeze and shoot from where you are.

 

Also, what is up with puffing out your cheeks on the draw?

 

giphy.gif

 

You can see it clearly on Stage 7, too, when you move uprange, and on stage 8 when you shoot the left side of the first position. Looks like you're taking a huge breath in and holding it. Don't be so tense, man.


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#13 gentleman4561

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 10:42 AM

This is what just comes to mind:

 

Set up a drill that tricks you in to doing it, so you get used to stopping it and preventing it. Something like two barricades 5y apart. Start 3y back and between them. One medium-hard target (10-15y partial) on each side, so you want to set up tall and stable.

 

Run to the left side of the left barricade, and let yourself set up. Feel yourself standing up like you're riding an escalator. Shoot the target. Run to the right side of the right barricade and shoot around it. Feel as you leave P1 yourself "riding the escalator" back down and "riding the escalator" back up at P2. Do that a few times to really feel what it feels like when you start to stand up and penalty you pay every time you leave position. I think this drill should work fine live or dry fire. Just don't 1/3rd scale the movement distance, of course.

 

Then start focusing on noticing the feeling of riding the escalator up, and just stop and shoot from where you are. Keep your low stance. It might be too narrow, but fuck it, that's the cost of progress. Get used to shooting low. As you do it more, you'll naturally want to widen out your stance. Allow that to happen. But if you ever feel yourself riding the escalator up, freeze and shoot from where you are.

 

Also, what is up with puffing out your cheeks on the draw?

 

giphy.gif

 

You can see it clearly on Stage 7, too, when you move uprange, and on stage 8 when you shoot the left side of the first position. Looks like you're taking a huge breath in and holding it. Don't be so tense, man.

Good stuff! I appreciate it!

 

I have no idea why I do that, but it seems to naturally happen in both live and dry fire. 


You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#14 gentleman4561

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 11:01 AM

Started yesterdays live fire with a cold run of Distance Changeup.

 

3.24 2A, 1B 1M 2NS, and 2A.

 

Obviously pushed way too fast on the cold run of Distance Change up, still not sure if my cold runs in practice should be "match" style or "how fast can I go and hold it together".

 

Spent the majority of practice shooting bill drills, doubles and head shots at 25 yards.  My bill drills at 25 are getting consistently better, but not as fast or as accurate the splits, I can shoot in doubles drill.

 

I think this is because on the double drill I have time to focus on all the important aspects of making good hits at 25 yards.

 

When it comes to the Bill Drill, I am focused on keeping my head still, seeing my front sight, gripping the gun hard etc. and I find that I often screw up one portion of that.

 

25 Yard headshots are still frustrating, I still can not shoot them as accurately as I could with my 9mm 2011. Perhaps this is due to a production vs. custom gun, perhaps this is due to load developments...but most likely it is due to poor trigger control. 

 

I feel like I have a ton to work on, my "to-do list" keeps getting longer, so I am going to work to separate it out to make dry/live fire a little less overwhelming. 

 

Added video of some draw and shoots on a 25yd metric.

 

Specifically working on reducing the amount of movement in my head/shoulders on the draw and pulling through my DA nice and smoothly. 


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You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#15 Stubb

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 07:28 PM

Both of us need to get our support hands on the gun earlier in the draw.



#16 Peally

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 07:35 PM

Good stuff! I appreciate it!

I have no idea why I do that, but it seems to naturally happen in both live and dry fire.


Plz stahp

#17 gentleman4561

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 10:38 PM

Both of us need to get our support hands on the gun earlier in the draw.

I have been working on that.  I reviewed a lot of HKims footage over the past week and notice his support hand almost touches his holster on the draw.

 

In dry fire, it seems noticeably faster and more consistent.  


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You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#18 gentleman4561

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 10:39 PM

Plz stahp

Working  on it!


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You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#19 gentleman4561

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 07:57 PM

Montlake Sportsman Club - July 2018 Match

 

2nd place production, 89.64%

 

 

 

Stage 1 - Felt pretty good here other than throwing away too many points, then saw that I got beat by almost 2 full seconds. Not sure what plan the winner ran, but I am assuming it must have been better than mine as I don't think the slow load out of P1 cost me all that time. Pace for the 2nd position was a bit slow, but going to 11 was in my head and worrying me.

 

Stage 2 - Points were almost all there until I threw a headshot high from the port, I think I was just too worried about moving and it cost me. The draw was a bit funky, but don't remember exactly what slowed it down. Also, need to keep working/seeing my sights on partials in practice as I took a makeup shot I didn't need hardcover off the start.

 

Stage 3 - Mike city here, both of the middle partials were C/M with my hits both low right in the head. I was scared of the no-shoot and picked a way higher aiming point than I should have and it cost me huge at this stage.

 

Stage 4 - Pretty happy with how this one went, shot the plate rack rather slowly...but going to 10 I think I was quite focused on not dropping a shot so I took my sweet time.

 

Stage 5 - Happy with this one too, I am still not sure if the standing reload was worth the time, but it eliminated a fairly deep position on the left and I was able to win the stage so I maybe it made sense?

 

Stage 6 - I almost zeroed this stage with 2 M/NS on the strong hand. The past 3 classifiers I have shot have all had some form of one-handed shooting, and have gone poorly...so obviously, this is an area that needs improvement in both live and dry fire. Until I get some more strong hand shooting under my belt, I think I need to focus a bit harder on a good trigger press when shooting one-handed to avoid these kinds of disasters.

 

Overall notes:

Still not staying as low as I need to be

Head/shoulder movement appears to be decreased on the draw

More SHO/WHO practice

Reloads are still costing me lots of time

Seems I either shot partials like I was scared of them or way too fast, need to continue to practice on them to find that good medium.

Still taking a huge breath on the draw/puffing my cheeks up, working in dryfire to eliminate that.


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You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.


#20 gentleman4561

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 01:46 PM

Dryfire El Prez - Simulated 10yds on 1/3rd targets is consistently sub 4 seconds now.  I will hit the goal time of 3.5 when the draw and reload go perfect but am generally "firing" the final shot at 3.8.

 

Previous notes showed my best times with my 2011 and magwell on this drill with full size targets at 5 yards was 4.2

 

Boy are simulated distance targets nice!


You're either moving forward or you're moving backward. "Maintenance" is a cute way of describing slow, almost unnoticeable regression.





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